Astronomical Events for February 2015

Hello everybody,

Here are the astronomical events occurring in the month of April: (All times are given in UTC format)

       Astronomical Events

  • February 1: Venus passes 0.8 degrees of Neptune. This occurs at approximately 17:00.
  • February 5: Earth crosses Jupiter’s equatorial plane, which means we are in the second half of occulation and eclipse season of Jupiter’s Moons.
  • February 6: Earth reaches opposition with Jupiter at approximately 18:00.
  • February 6: The Moon reaches its apogee of 406,200 km at 18:25.
  • February 18: The Moon is new. This Moon is also a Black Moon, where this will be the third New Moon in a season where four New Moons are normal.
  • February 20: The Moon, Venus, and Mars are in conjunction with each other. This meeting occurs at Dusk.
  • February 21: Venus passes 0.4 degrees south of Mars at Dusk. Moon will have moved away by then.
  • February 24: Mercury reaches greatest morning elongation at 26.7 degrees west of the sun. This will take place at 19:00.
  • February 25: The Moon will occult Aldebaran at 23:26 in Northern Europe.
  • February 25: Neptune is at conjunction with the Sun. Will not be visible until it comes out from the other side.

 Here is a look at Comet Lovejoy’s Path (Obtained from Bob Moler’s Ephemeris Blog)

Comet Lovejoy

Comet Lovejoy reached it Perihelion two days ago, and will now move away from the Sun, and the Earth. It will lose its tail, and start to dim. This image was obtained from Bob Moler’s Ephemeris Blog.

 

 

Announcement: On April 22, 2015, I will be delivering a presentation at the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada’s Recreational Meetup, talking about my journey as an amateur astrophotographer. I hope you can all come to this event.

 

WORK CITED

http://www.universetoday.com/116461/the-top-101-astronomical-events-to-watch-for-in-2015/

https://bobmoler.wordpress.com/

Sky News Magazine – January/February Issue

 

WORK CONSULTED

http://astroguyz.com/2012/08/27/astro-event-whats-in-a-name-black-blue-moons-through-2020/

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Astronomical Events for January 2015

Hello everybody,

Happy New Year!

Here are the astronomical events occurring in the month of April: (All times are given in UTC format)

       Astronomical Events

  • January 1: Comet C/2012 Q2 Lovejoy might reach naked eye visibility.
  • January 3: The Quadrantid Meteor shower will peak at 2:00. Favours Northern Europe.
  • January 4: Earth reaches perihelion at approximately 8:00. The sun will look its biggest and be at its closest.
  • January 14: Mercury reaches 18.9 degrees East of the sun at approximately 16:00.
  • January 17: Moons of Io and Europa are expected to cast a double shadow eclipse on Jupiter from 3:53 – 4:58.
  • January 20: Mars passes 0.2 degrees from Neptune at approx 20:00.
  • January 23-24: A triple-transit event on Jupiter. This one is particularly unique because Callisto will Eclipse Io, which means two of the shadows will merge for a short period of time at 5:48 UTC. EST people will see it at 12:48 am. It won’t last long, so be ready for it.!
  • January 29: The Moon will occult Aldebaran at approximately 17:31 UTC for the Arctic. This will be the first occultation by the Moon in 2015.

Since this is the New Year, I was thinking we could go through the Top 10 events according to SkyNews:

  1. March 24: The Moon will pass close to Aldebaran throughout 2015. However, this time, the Moon will pass close to the Hyades star cluster.
  2. April 4: The tetrad of total lunar eclipses will continue again. This will take place before the dawn. This is best seen in Western Canada. In Toronto, the Moon will set during the initial partial phase. Totality will last five minutes only.
  3. April 21: Mercury will appear its best, with Mars close by. Nearby will be Venus and a crescent Moon. Venus will reach its greatest angle from the Sun on June 6.
  4. June 30: Venus and Jupiter will reach close conjunction, just 20 arc minutes apart. They will be close enough to see in the telescope in the same eyepiece. On June 19, the waxing Moon will be close to Venus and Jupiter to make a triple conjunction.
  5. September 5: Aldebaran will be occulted by the Moon. It will be visible in southern Ontario and farther east. Moon will rise and soon after, from midnight to 2 am, and occult Aldebaran. Western Canada will be able to see the Moon occult Aldebaran on November 26, from 2 – 4 am. It will be on the full phase.
  6. September 27: The last total eclipse in the Tetrad. Won’t happen again for a long time. This will happen in the early evening and is visible across all of Canada. From the west coast, The Moon rises just before totality begins. The Moon will reach its closest to Earth for 2015, less than one hour before totality. It will last for 72 minutes. Coastal areas will also see higher tides.
  7. October 8: Moon will get into a close conjunction with Venus, Regulus, and nearby will be Mars, Jupiter, and Mercury. This will be best morning appearance for 2015 for Canada. On October 11, a crescent Moon will appear 2 degrees before Mercury.
  8. October 23: Mercury will shine below a close conjunction of Jupiter, Venus and Mars. Mars and Jupiter will be 1/2 degree apart on October 17, and 18 and on October 25, Venus and Jupiter will pass 1 degree within each other. On October 28, the Mars, Venus and Jupiter will get close to each other again in the morning sky.
  9. November 7: Moon will get close of Venus, Mars and Jupiter. Moon will get close to Venus by 1.5 degrees. Mars will be nearby as well. Earlier in the week, Venus will pass 3/4 degree from Mars on the mornings of November 2 and 3. This will be a second chance for those who miss the februrary 20 event, (see honourable mentions)
  10. December 7: Venus and Moon will get into close conjunction and then occult. Venus and Moon will get close to each other. They are in a long line across the sky. As time goes on, the Moon will get closer to Venus, until the Moon passes in front of Venus during the day. It will be visible across all of Canada.

Honourable Mentions:

  • February 20: A triple conjunction will take place. The waxing crescent Moon, Mars and Venus will get very close to each other.
  • January 19: For those with telescopes, this will be a good chance for amateurs to get a glimpse of Neptune as Mars will pass very close to Neptune. It will be a full 13 arc minutes away.

 

 

 

WORK CITED

http://www.universetoday.com/107259/101-astronomical-events-for-2014/

rascto.ca

 

WORKS CONSULTED

http://www.cita.utoronto.ca/

One year ago…

Last year, I was given the idea by my parents to start writing a blog about my experiences with astronomy. I took that idea and created “Joly Astronomy.” Throughout this year I kept writing about my experiences, all the good and the bad. Four days ago was my blog’s first anniversary, and this year has given me many opportunities to observe and explore the night sky, image celestial objects, and stand in awe of the universe. I saw and imaged:

  • The Lunar Eclipse.
  • M42.
  • A meteor shower.
  • ISS flying in the sky.
  • The Sun and its sunspots.
  • Conjunctions.
  • The beauty of Long Sault Conservation Park’s and Glen Major’s dark skies.
  • Star trails in dark skies.
  • and many more objects in the night sky.

Thank You to everyone who comes and reads my blog. You are all awesome. Keep coming back, and keep looking up. You never know what you might find up there.

Astronomical Events for December 2014

Hello everybody,

Here are the astronomical events occurring in the month of December: (All times are given in UTC format)

       Astronomical Events

  • December 9: A double shadow transit of Jupiter’s moons will occur. It will take place from 4:18 to 4:27. It’ll be best seen in Eastern North America. Don’t miss it!
  • December 12: Another double shadow transit of Jupiter’s moons will occur from 16:19 to 16:44. It favours North-Western North America.
  • December 13: Geminid Meteor Shower will peak at approximately 1:00. Unfortunately, a waning gibbous moon will obstruct our view.
  • December 18: Asteroid 702 Alauda will occult a star that shines at +6.2 magnitude. It will be best seen at eastern Australia at 14:12.
  • December 21: The Winter Solstice occurs at 23:03. The Northern hemisphere will experience the shortest day of the year, and the Southern hemisphere will experience the longest day of the year.
  • December 21: The International Space Station will experience a period of full illumination with many views of the ISS, best seen at the southern hemisphere.
  • December 21: ANOTHER double shadow transit of Jupiter’s moons will occur. It will take place from 14:17 to 15:55. It will be best seen in Asia and Australia.

Thank You.

Keep Looking Up!

 

WORK CITED

http://www.universetoday.com/107259/101-astronomical-events-for-2014/

Astronomical Events for November 2014

Hello everybody,

Here are the astronomical events occurring in the month of November: (All times are given in UTC format)

       Astronomical Events

  • November 1: Mercury reaches its greatest elongation at 18.7 degrees West of the Sun. It will have a brightness at magnitude -0.5. This is the best time to see Mercury in 2014, for observers in the Northern Hemisphere.
  • November 18: Leonoid meteor shower will peak at this time. It is best seen in the Altantic region. The moon will be in a waning crescent phase, which means the Moon’s light will not obstruct the meteor shower.
  • November 20: Asteroid 3 Juno will occult a +7.4 magnitude star. It is best seen in North-eastern US and Eastern Canada.
  • November 27: Moon will have its farthest perigee of 2014 at 369,824 km at 23:12.

Happy Observing!

 

WORK CITED

http://www.universetoday.com/107259/101-astronomical-events-for-2014/

Astronomical Events for October 2014

Hello everybody,

Here are the astronomical events occurring in the month of October: (All times are given in UTC format)

       Astronomical Events

  • October 4: 1 Ceres passes 30′ north of Saturn.
  • October 6: Draconid Meteor shower, which is hard to predict due to a high variability of rates and timing, is not likely to be seen due to a Full moon.
  • October 8: A total lunar eclipse will occur at 10:56 UTC. It will be visible from the Pacific Rim. Here is an image that shows where the eclipse will be visible from. Anything east of the intense red shading, means that the Moon will set during the eclipse. Anything west of the intense red shading, means that the Moon will rise during the eclipse.
    path720

    Where the Eclipse will be visible from.

    In addition, Uranus will be a degree away from the eclipsed Moon. Check it out!

  • October 13: The Moon reaches its shallowest northern declination at +18.5 degrees.
  • October 14: Comet C/2012 K1 PanSTARRS may reach magnitude 5.0 for southern hemisphere observers.
  • October 19: Comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring passes just 7′ from the planet Mars. The Globular cluster NGC 6401 also lies nearby. The comet’s periareion (Periapsis on Mars) will be from 138,000 – 141,000 km from the surface of Mars. It will reach periareion at 18:28 UTC. To compare the distance, Mars’ outer moon, Deimos orbits at 24,000 km from the planet. It’ll be pretty far away, but on the surface of Mars, it will have a brightness of magnitude -6. That means it will appear to look as bright as Venus from Earth.  Check it out!

    Path of Mars and Comet Siding Spring

    Path of Mars and Comet Siding Spring

  • October 22: The Orionid meteor shower will peak at approximately 5:00 UTC. It will be best viewed in the Americas. It will be good, since the Moon is at a waning crescent phase.
  • October 22: The Moon will occult Mercury in Australia 24 hrs prior to New Moon.
  • October 23: A partial solar eclipse will take place. It will be visible in North America. It’s greatest eclipse will take place North of Nunavut, at 21:46 UTC. Make sure you get proper eye protection to see the solar eclipse. Don’t miss it!!

    599px-SE2014Oct23P-580x580

    Path and Visibility of the Eclipse.

  • October 25: The Moon will occult Saturn for the Northern Atlantic at approximately 15:43 UTC.
  • October 25: The Moon will reach its shallowest southern point for 2014, at a declination of -18.6 degrees.

 

 

WORK CITED

http://www.universetoday.com/107259/101-astronomical-events-for-2014/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C/2013_A1

http://mars.nasa.gov/comets/sidingspring/

 

WORKS CONSULTED

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apsis

Astronomical Events for September 2014

Hello everybody,

Here are the astronomical events occurring in the month of September: (All times are given in UTC format)

       Astronomical Events

  • September 5: Venus passes 0.7 degrees from Regulus.
  • September 9: The last supermoon of the year will occur that day at 1:39 UTC, 22 hours after passing its perigee.
  • September 15: Comet C/2013 V5 Oukaimeden might reach 5.5 magnitude for observers in the southern hemisphere.
  • September 20: Mercury will pass 0.5 degrees south of Spica at 21:00 UTC.
  • September 21: Mercury will reach its greatest elongation, being 26.4 degrees east of the Sun. It will shine at Magnitude 0, in the dawn sky. The best view of this will be for southern hemisphere observers.
  • September 23: The Autumnal Equinox will occur at 2:29 UTC. At this point, the Northern and Southern hemispheres will have exactly 12 hours in their day. Here is a video that shows the Earth through one year. http://youtu.be/FmCJqykN2J0
  • September 23: GEO Satellites eclipse seasons occur. This is when the Geosynchronous Satellites will enter the Earth’s shadow and, just like a lunar eclipse, becomes darkened for a few minutes.
  • September 28: The Moon will occult Saturn at approximately 4:25 UTC. The Moon will also occult minor planets 1 Ceres and 4 Vesta at the same day.

Enjoy and Happy Observing!

 

WORK CITED

http://www.universetoday.com/107259/101-astronomical-events-for-2014/